Posts Tagged ‘Paris’

Dialogue: John Wilson/ Joseph Norman

Friday, September 1st, 1995

JOHN WILSON is a clas­si­cally trained artist whose life’s work has been a search for enduring, spir­i­tu­ally charged images of African-Amer­i­cans. JOSEPH NORMAN weaves together all kinds of imagery into elab­o­rate compo­si­tions that are elegant, yet full of feeling. “For both of these artists, art remains an impor­tant way to think about what it means to be human and to have an inner life.”

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Mary Cassatt

Friday, July 14th, 1989

In many of the prints, a woman’s face is partially obscured, either because of the way she has turned her head, or because she is holding some­thing in front of her face ‑‑ a hand, a letter, a child. This conveys a sense of mystery, a feeling that there are secret mean­ings and moments of tragedy and what Virginia Woolf called “ecstasy” — hidden in the texture of a woman’s daily life.

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The Situationists

Saturday, January 28th, 1989

The Situ­a­tion­ists called for an art of excess, delirium, outrage, and social change. They believed that capi­talism had turned contem­po­rary life into a society of “spec­tacle” that its inhab­i­tants could only passively watch and consume. Situ­a­tionism would bring art out of the museums and into the streets, and sabo­tage the society of spec­tacle by creating situ­a­tions in which people could turn their own lives into a creative expe­ri­ence.

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Renoir: A Lesson in Happiness

Saturday, December 1st, 1984

His hands were terribly deformed. Rheuma­tism had cracked the joints, bending the thumb toward the palm and the other fingers toward the wrist. Visi­tors who weren’t used to it couldn’t take their eyes off this muti­la­tion. Their reac­tion, which they didn’t dare express, was: ‘It’s not possible. With those hands, he can’t paint these pictures. There’s a mystery!’ The mystery was Renoir himself.”

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Jean-Francois Millet: Seeds of Impressionism

Friday, June 1st, 1984

Jean-Fran­cois MILLET saw a time­less beauty and sadness in life, in evenings dark and filled with color. “What I know of happi­ness is the quiet, the silence, that you can savor so deli­ciously, either in the forests, or in the fields,” he wrote.

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