Posts Tagged ‘Paris’

Dialogue: John Wilson/ Joseph Norman

Friday, September 1st, 1995

JOHN WILSON is a classically trained artist whose life’s work has been a search for enduring, spiritually charged images of African-Americans. JOSEPH NORMAN weaves together all kinds of imagery into elaborate compositions that are elegant, yet full of feeling. “For both of these artists, art remains an important way to think about what it means to be human and to have an inner life.”

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Mary Cassatt

Friday, July 14th, 1989

In many of the prints, a woman’s face is partially obscured, either because of the way she has turned her head, or because she is holding something in front of her face ‑‑ a hand, a letter, a child. This conveys a sense of mystery, a feeling that there are secret meanings and moments of tragedy and what Virginia Woolf called “ecstasy” — hidden in the texture of a woman’s daily life.

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The Situationists

Saturday, January 28th, 1989

The Situationists called for an art of excess, delirium, outrage, and social change. They believed that capitalism had turned contemporary life into a society of “spectacle” that its inhabitants could only passively watch and consume. Situationism would bring art out of the museums and into the streets, and sabotage the society of spectacle by creating situations in which people could turn their own lives into a creative experience.

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Renoir: A Lesson in Happiness

Saturday, December 1st, 1984

“His hands were terribly deformed. Rheumatism had cracked the joints, bending the thumb toward the palm and the other fingers toward the wrist. Visitors who weren’t used to it couldn’t take their eyes off this mutilation. Their reaction, which they didn’t dare express, was: ‘It’s not possible. With those hands, he can’t paint these pictures. There’s a mystery!’ The mystery was Renoir himself.”

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Jean-Francois Millet: Seeds of Impressionism

Friday, June 1st, 1984

Jean-Francois MILLET saw a timeless beauty and sadness in life, in evenings dark and filled with color. “What I know of happiness is the quiet, the silence, that you can savor so deliciously, either in the forests, or in the fields,” he wrote.

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