Posts Tagged ‘Michael Mazur’

The Inferno of Dante

Sunday, January 1st, 1995

Dante’s vision of Hell is filled with terri­fying images of trans­for­ma­tion, yet its ulti­mate horror is its change­less­ness — the unre­pen­tant sinners whose punish­ment is to embody, forever, their sins. Centuries after its obscure Floren­tine villains have been forgotten, the poem still rings true as a drama of the inner life, because the heart of the poem is the hope that we can still be changed.

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12th Annual Boston Drawing Show

Saturday, April 13th, 1991

GERRY BERG­STEIN’s draw­ings show scrib­bles, scrawls, cross­ings-out, angry re-work­ings, mark­ings of struggle and doubt. From this chaos of marks on paper emerge lumi­nous little still lives, marked by the process of decay: visions of a world in flux, where every­thing is changing, growing, living, dying, and being reborn.

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The Unique Print

Sunday, December 9th, 1990

In mono­type, there is no fixed image on the printing surface. The artist paints or draws on a printing plate, makes changes, and prints again; the final proof is an accu­mu­la­tion of all the changes that have been made. Pale, faded images of past impres­sions often cling to mono­types like shadows; they are called “ghosts.”

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Michael Mazur

Sunday, May 1st, 1983

In MICHAEL MAZUR’s hands, the Mono­type was the perfect form to convey the multi­plicity of life in the natural world. The clearest, most lucid flowers are surrounded by a paler aura of other flowers, other summers, other inter­pre­ta­tions — a riot of reeds and flowers, organic growth, confu­sion, and decay. Revenants of images repeat like ghostly, half-remem­bered things.

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Becoming an Art Critic

Thursday, April 13th, 1978

In 1979, an 11th century Persian poem with 50,000 rhyming couplets, illu­mi­nated by tiny paint­ings in exquisite colors made from crushed jewels and insects’ wings, inspired my first story about art. For the next 20 years, I wrote, published, and broad­cast hundreds of Stories about Art in Boston and beyond. This is how it all began.

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