Posts Tagged ‘ICA’

El Corazon Sangrante/The Bleeding Heart

Friday, November 1st, 1991

FRIDA KAHLO’s Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird shows her in a jungle with butterflies in her hair and a hummingbird dangling from a thorn necklace that pierces her neck, drawing small red drops of blood. “I never painted dreams,” she said. “I painted my own reality.”

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Rosemarie Trockel

Saturday, May 25th, 1991

“All these images are obliterated, defaced, lost. It’s about those marginal, mundane experiences that are for some reason significant to her. There are certain things about her work that are mysterious. They remain mysterious. And she treasures that mysteriousness.”

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Ilya Kabakov/Soviet Conceptual Art

Sunday, January 6th, 1991

When you look up, all those fragments convey a vertiginous sense of disintegration, and decay. But when you look down, everything is compressed onto a single shiny surface, and it’s beautiful. All that debris — all that waste and pain — is transformed into art.

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Censorship and the Arts

Saturday, June 9th, 1990

It takes a lot of courage to be an artist. All kinds of things get in the way, but the thing that gets in the way the most is fear. That’s why the threat of censorship is so dangerous to Art. Art helps us to see the beautiful — and also to face the ugliness in life. Artists need to be free to show us the world as they see it — to tell it like it is.

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Sophie Calle

Wednesday, January 24th, 1990

SOPHIE CALLE borrows elements from detective novels, philosophical investigations, the film noir, the nouveau roman, documentary photography, love letters, art movies, B-movies, John Cage’s theories of randomness, and Joseph Beuys’s actions. She combines them in startling ways, as meditations on the mysterious spaces between self and other.

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Yoko Ono

Sunday, January 7th, 1990

Every viewer who chooses to participate will have a different experience. For me, it was a moving meditation on loss, change, and getting a second chance. As one of the characters in William Faulkner’s novel The Wild Palms says, “Between grief and nothing, I will take grief.”

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My Day Without Art

Monday, December 4th, 1989

Standing at the center of the spiral, I see the backs of all the chairs facing away from me, and feel a tremendous shock of loneliness and loss. Looking down from the balcony, I see that the chairs are the beginning of a spiral that could go on forever.

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The Situationists

Saturday, January 28th, 1989

The Situationists called for an art of excess, delirium, outrage, and social change. They believed that capitalism had turned contemporary life into a society of “spectacle” that its inhabitants could only passively watch and consume. Situationism would bring art out of the museums and into the streets, and sabotage the society of spectacle by creating situations in which people could turn their own lives into a creative experience.

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Frances Hamilton: Pieces of Time

Sunday, May 22nd, 1988

FRANCES HAMILTON’s art doesn’t come from the head; it comes from the hand and the heart. And that’s why a show of her work is always so rewarding. Her images stay with you, growing richer and deeper, as time goes by. They trigger memories. Major or minor, they touch a chord.

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