Posts Tagged ‘Fogg Art Museum’

John Singer Sargent

Tuesday, June 29th, 1999

He was the preem­i­nent portrait painter of his day, and he gave it all up to paint land­scapes. His private life is a mystery. His brush­work is still dazzling. JOHN SINGER SARGENT seems to have walked out of the pages of a novel by Henry James, who wrote of him: “Yes, I have always thought of Sargent as a great painter. He would be greater still if he had done one or two little things he hasn’t — but he will do.”

Read the full article »

The Future of Art

Friday, March 1st, 1991

It is art that acknowl­edges the struggle of its own making, and conveys a sense of life as composed of frag­ments, where not every­thing is legible, and some things are irrev­o­cably ruined or lost. The past haunts and enriches the present. Memory and imag­i­na­tion are inter­twined. It is a mirror of the soul.

Read the full article »

My Day Without Art

Monday, December 4th, 1989

Standing at the center of the spiral, I see the backs of all the chairs facing away from me, and feel a tremen­dous shock of lone­li­ness and loss. Looking down from the balcony, I see that the chairs are the begin­ning of a spiral that could go on forever.

Read the full article »

The Drawings of Palladio

Saturday, May 1st, 1982

There is some­thing divine about his talent, some­thing compa­rable to the power of a great poet who, out of the worlds of truth and false­hood, creates a third whose borrowed exis­tence enchants us.”

Read the full article »

Ingres 1780 – 1980

Monday, December 1st, 1980

For a twen­tieth-century audi­ence brought up on abstrac­tion, INGRES’s great­ness, his fasci­na­tion, lies in the abstract qual­i­ties of his line, its rest­less, obses­sive move­ment across the page. Ingres’ line has power, grace, life; it’s bril­liant, dramatic, neurotic, even perverse. He told his students, “Drawing is every­thing; it is all of Art.”

Read the full article »