Posts Tagged ‘Elizabeth Vigee-Lebrun’

Elizabeth Vigee-Lebrun

Friday, July 19th, 1991
Elizabeth Vigee-Lebrun

Madame Vigee-Lebrun revo­lu­tion­ized the portrait. She despised the powder and stiff clothes that women wore; she let their hair down, and draped them in soft, flowing shawls and painted them looking soft, dreamy, natural, alive. Her paint­ings helped to create a new look, a new style, a new atti­tude to life in pre-revo­lu­tionary Paris.

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The Future of Art

Friday, March 1st, 1991

It is art that acknowl­edges the struggle of its own making, and conveys a sense of life as composed of frag­ments, where not every­thing is legible, and some things are irrev­o­cably ruined or lost. The past haunts and enriches the present. Memory and imag­i­na­tion are inter­twined. It is a mirror of the soul.

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The Grand Tour

Sunday, January 28th, 1990

Light as a whisper, these elegant images, in the deli­cate style known as ROCOCO, convey the “sweet­ness of life” before the Revo­lu­tion. Some­thing of the warmth of the artist’s hand still lingers in all the little jabs and touches of chalk or ink that make up these deli­cious little 18th century draw­ings and prints.

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Simon Schama’s CITIZENS

Tuesday, March 7th, 1989

CITIZENS, Simon Schama’s wonderful new book about the French Revo­lu­tion, is espe­cially fasci­nating to people who care about Art, because it is in many ways a book about the power of images to trans­form the world.

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