Archive for the ‘Prints’ Category

Meryl at the Rose

Tuesday, April 28th, 2009

Hundreds of people came to MERYL BRATER’s Memo­rial Exhi­bi­tion at the Rose Art Museum. We all believed that Meryl would live on at the Rose, and that many gener­a­tions to come would have the chance to know her through her art. To close the museum now would be a terrible blow to everyone who loved her – to everyone who trusted their trea­sure to the Rose.

Read the full article »

The Inferno of Dante

Sunday, January 1st, 1995

Dante’s vision of Hell is filled with terri­fying images of trans­for­ma­tion, yet its ulti­mate horror is its change­less­ness — the unre­pen­tant sinners whose punish­ment is to embody, forever, their sins. Centuries after its obscure Floren­tine villains have been forgotten, the poem still rings true as a drama of the inner life, because the heart of the poem is the hope that we can still be changed.

Read the full article »

Working Proof: Experimental Etching Studio

Saturday, November 21st, 1992

Ten years ago, I spent a very happy summer working at Exper­i­mental Etching Studio, so I was delighted when the Boston Public Library invited me to help shape a conver­sa­tion among a group of artists from this extra­or­di­nary print­making coop­er­a­tive.

Read the full article »

The Unique Print

Sunday, December 9th, 1990

In mono­type, there is no fixed image on the printing surface. The artist paints or draws on a printing plate, makes changes, and prints again; the final proof is an accu­mu­la­tion of all the changes that have been made. Pale, faded images of past impres­sions often cling to mono­types like shadows; they are called “ghosts.”

Read the full article »

Robert Rauschenberg

Tuesday, May 22nd, 1990

Great art cheats death of its victory by trans­forming memo­ry’s fragile frag­ments into some­thing lasting, precious, and incor­rupt­ible. The ghostly white porch is a window to a world beyond flesh and paint — a world without sorrow or substance, color or weight. It is cool, pale, and white as a bone.

Read the full article »

American Screenprints

Tuesday, September 26th, 1989

Many of the most memo­rable images of the sixties were silkscreen prints: Andy Warhol’s soup­cans, Mari­lyns, and Jackies, Roy Licht­en­steins’s day-glo brush­strokes on Ben-Day dots, Sister Cori­ta’s Flower Power messages, Robert Indi­ana’s LOVE, and Ed Ruscha’s dazzling 1966 Stan­dard Station, radiant and gleaming in the Cali­fornia light.

Read the full article »

Mary Cassatt

Friday, July 14th, 1989

In many of the prints, a woman’s face is partially obscured, either because of the way she has turned her head, or because she is holding some­thing in front of her face ‑‑ a hand, a letter, a child. This conveys a sense of mystery, a feeling that there are secret mean­ings and moments of tragedy and what Virginia Woolf called “ecstasy” — hidden in the texture of a woman’s daily life.

Read the full article »

Michael Mazur

Sunday, May 1st, 1983

In MICHAEL MAZUR’s hands, the Mono­type was the perfect form to convey the multi­plicity of life in the natural world. The clearest, most lucid flowers are surrounded by a paler aura of other flowers, other summers, other inter­pre­ta­tions — a riot of reeds and flowers, organic growth, confu­sion, and decay. Revenants of images repeat like ghostly, half-remem­bered things.

Read the full article »