Archive for the ‘Movies’ Category

Vanity Fair

Tuesday, May 18th, 2004

Thack­eray endows Rebecca Sharp — “that artful little minx — with all the qual­i­ties which make his own writing so delightful. He portrays Rebecca as an artist — the lost, bril­liant child of a singer and a painter, singing and dancing, scheming and dreaming her way though life.

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The Eliminator

Friday, November 1st, 1996

THE ELIMINATOR begins as a cop thriller, then turns into a spy movie, then a horror movie with flesh-eating zombies, then a myth­ical epic, and finally achieves tran­scen­dence with an ironic evoca­tion of William Butler Yeats’ great line of poetry, “A terrible beauty is born.”

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Richard Linklater

Thursday, February 1st, 1996

It’s unful­filled longing. It’s being young. Meet me at 20. I don’t know what I want to do. I kind of want to write. You want to be a artist, to express what’s going on in your life. It’s a way to lose your­self in your discon­tent. Other­wise you’d just go out and shoot and vandalize. Art is more internal.”

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Julian Schnabel

Wednesday, January 10th, 1996

The scene when BASQUIAT is painting — the Charlie Parker and Max Roach riff is from his record collec­tion. It’s very heady at that moment…Success is when you’re making the work of art. The moment of perfect sonorous bliss.”

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Basquiat

Tuesday, January 2nd, 1996

BASQUIAT captures the artist’s yearning and anguish, moments of bliss and the sheer phys­ical plea­sure of making art. His later descent into drugs, lone­li­ness, confu­sion and despair is truly tragic — you feel him pursued by the Furies of greed, racism, and disease, tracking him inex­orably down.

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Emma

Monday, January 1st, 1996

Holly­wood has fallen in love with JANE AUSTEN. Her scripts feature snappy dialogue; her plots follow the classic formula of girl meets boy; girl loses boy; girl gets boy; her story lines move deli­ciously from chaos and confu­sion to harmony and delight. The latest is EMMA, played to perfec­tion by GWYNETH PALTROW in Wedg­wood colors, Empire dresses and pearl-drop earrings.

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Jean Arthur

Wednesday, May 30th, 1990

On film, JEAN ARTHUR is impul­sive, but truthful ‑‑ true to the moment, while the moment lasts. She is chaste, but not prudish; she truly inhabits her small, athletic body, and she moves like a dancer with an easy natural volup­tuous­ness. Her soft, grav­elly voice is aston­ishly expres­sive. And some of her greatest lines aren’t words at all, but an aston­ishing reper­toire of whim­pers, sighs, sobs, giggles, and moans.

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Gene Kelly

Tuesday, April 24th, 1990

GENE KELLY was a great dancer because his dancing seemed to be an over­flow of his superb vitality — a natural exten­sion of his person­ality. In all his movies, the tran­si­tions to dance are incred­ibly smooth, because even when he’s not dancing he’s thinking about dancing – his athletic body is flexed and limber– and he’s ready to roll, even on an empty set with 500,000 kilo­watts of elec­tric light mimic­king star­dust and a giant fan creating the sensa­tion of a moon­light breeze.

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David Salle/Imitation of Life

Thursday, March 29th, 1990

One of DAVID SALLE’s favorite movies is Douglas Sirk’s IMITATION OF LIFE. In one scene, all the char­ac­ters are jammed into a taxi, watching a funeral through the windows. In Salle’s paint­ings, too, many different things are happening at once, every­thing is crammed together, nothing seems finished, every­thing is seen in reflec­tion or juxta­po­si­tion or through a filter or a pane of glass, and all of the contra­dic­tions are left unre­solved.

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The Situationists

Saturday, January 28th, 1989

The Situ­a­tion­ists called for an art of excess, delirium, outrage, and social change. They believed that capi­talism had turned contem­po­rary life into a society of “spec­tacle” that its inhab­i­tants could only passively watch and consume. Situ­a­tionism would bring art out of the museums and into the streets, and sabo­tage the society of spec­tacle by creating situ­a­tions in which people could turn their own lives into a creative expe­ri­ence.

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Robert Ferrandini

Saturday, December 1st, 1984

ROBERT FERRANDINI’s early work featured flying saucers and monsters, imagery drawn from a 1950’s child­hood spent watching science-fiction movies like When Worlds Collide and The Thing. In his new paint­ings of imag­i­nary land­scapes and seascapes, he has come to some kind of terms with his past and is ready to move on. His space­ship has finally landed in a world of his own making.

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