Archive for the ‘Interviews’ Category

Helen Pond and Herbert Senn

Sunday, December 1st, 1996

Boston Ballet’s new Nutcracker sets are the work of a designing couple, Helen Pond and Herbert Senn, who live in a Gothic house in Yarmouthport which they have fully restored with Gothic carving, painted ceilings and “lots and lots of quadrifoils,” says Herbert. “We designed the house and the Nutcracker at the same time. Nutcracker is my life.”

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Christopher Hogwood

Sunday, December 1st, 1996

CHRISTOPHER HOGWOOD has stopped conducting in the traditional “stuffed shirt” tails and white tie; he now wears a black silk shirt. It gives him the air of an artist — or a monk. The Maestro’s new clothes are a metaphor for his approach to music: not a dusty, lifeless tradition, but something authentic, full of meaning, and alive.

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A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Thursday, September 12th, 1996

Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream is about a royal wedding, lovers lost in an enchanted forest, magic spells, and fairy sprites. But mostly it is about imagination. In the course of the play, as the characters move in and out of the world of dreams, certain words repeat over and over again: Fancy. Imagination. Dream. Vision. Transported. Transfigured. Transformed.

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Brain Opera

Tuesday, July 2nd, 1996

The beautiful, beloved voice of LORRAINE HUNT began to rise and spread out through the room, in sweet, sad layers of sound, accompanied by a visual chorus of flashing colored lights, magically transforming the empty, mechanical space into a few moments of unearthly beauty.

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Florence Ladd

Thursday, June 13th, 1996

“The sea is a metaphor for transformation, the possibility of crossing over, for becoming someone else, for change,” says FLORENCE LADD. “Every time Sarah crosses the sea, it changes her. I believe in the unconscious and the way the unconscious enriches our interpretations of life.”

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Beth Soll / Richard Cornell

Monday, April 29th, 1996

Dancer Beth Soll and Composer Richard Cornell are working together on a dance inspired by a book by West African poet Amadou Hampate Ba. “It’s a long tale, an initiatory allegory, a triumph of knowledge over fortune and power,” says Cornell. “A quest for God and wisdom,” says Soll.

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Mark Morris/Orfeo

Thursday, April 11th, 1996

“It begins with a funereal chorus in the antique style, with cornetto and trombones. And then Orpheus comes in, lamenting his lost love, and sings one single word. Eurydice. He sings it three times. He doesn’t say much, but he says everything he needs to say, and the third time he sings it, it sends chills up your spine.””

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Herman Melville

Monday, April 1st, 1996

“Give me a condor’s quill! Give me Vesuvius’ crater for an inkstand! Friends, hold my arms! For in the mere act of penning my thoughts of this Leviathan, they weary me, and make me faint with their out-reaching comprehensiveness of sweep, as if to include the whole circle of the sciences, and all the generations of whales, and men, and mastodons, past, present, and to come, with all the revolving panoramas of empire on earth, and throughout the whole universe.”

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Stephen McCauley

Friday, February 2nd, 1996

“I suppose I read so many biographies because I was trying to understand how people stumbled through their days and their failures and spun their miseries and despair into great art or pathbreaking science or profound enlightenment.”

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Richard Linklater

Thursday, February 1st, 1996

“It’s unfulfilled longing. It’s being young. Meet me at 20. I don’t know what I want to do. I kind of want to write. You want to be a artist, to express what’s going on in your life. It’s a way to lose yourself in your discontent. Otherwise you’d just go out and shoot and vandalize. Art is more internal.”

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Julian Schnabel

Wednesday, January 10th, 1996

“The scene when BASQUIAT is painting — the Charlie Parker and Max Roach riff is from his record collection. It’s very heady at that moment…Success is when you’re making the work of art. The moment of perfect sonorous bliss.”

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Emma

Monday, January 1st, 1996

Hollywood has fallen in love with JANE AUSTEN. Her scripts feature snappy dialogue; her plots follow the classic formula of girl meets boy; girl loses boy; girl gets boy; her story lines move deliciously from chaos and confusion to harmony and delight. The latest is EMMA, played to perfection by GWYNETH PALTROW in Wedgwood colors, Empire dresses and pearl-drop earrings.

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Judy Kensley McKie

Saturday, December 2nd, 1995

Working in bronze, that most ancient and enduring of materials, JUDY MCKIE’s work reveals the power of art to console and heal. Her Bird Fountain has the silent, soaring presence of great mourning monuments. “The water makes you feel calm and peaceful,” she says. “It’s nourishing. A life force.”

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Working Proof: Experimental Etching Studio

Saturday, November 21st, 1992

Ten years ago, I spent a very happy summer working at Experimental Etching Studio, so I was delighted when the Boston Public Library invited me to help shape a conversation among a group of artists from this extraordinary printmaking cooperative.

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Camille Paglia

Monday, May 4th, 1992

“Moment by moment, night flickers in the imagination, in eroticism, subverting our strivings for virtue and order, giving an uncanny aura to objects and persons, revealed to us by artists.” “The sea, Dionysian liquid nature, is the master image in Shakespeare’s plays. It is the wave-motion within Shakespearean speech which transfixes the audience even when we don’t understand a word of it.”

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The Sound Artist: Hans Peter Kuhn

Monday, February 18th, 1991

“Sound art is more open and much closer to life than music. Music is a filtered experience. I’m not a composer. I don’t want the emotional view bound or directed in any one direction. I want to keep it open. I’m always trying things out. I hear something and I can pick it up and react in minutes. I’m interested in everything that makes a noise.”

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Ilya Kabakov/Soviet Conceptual Art

Sunday, January 6th, 1991

When you look up, all those fragments convey a vertiginous sense of disintegration, and decay. But when you look down, everything is compressed onto a single shiny surface, and it’s beautiful. All that debris — all that waste and pain — is transformed into art.

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Matt Mullican

Friday, July 6th, 1990

Being inside MATT MULLICAN’s installation is like being inside Matt Mullican’s mind – a dizzying experience. He’s constantly classifying and re-ordering everything. “It’s the first time I’ve arranged my meaning as objects in space depicting my meaning,” he says.

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Judy Kensley McKie and Todd McKie

Friday, June 15th, 1990

In 1969, TODD and JUDY MCKIE painted banners with the signs of the Zodiac for Woodstock, which people pulled down to use as tents and blankets in the rain. Judy began making furniture in the early 70s to furnish their apartment. One day she impulsively carved two crouching figures into the arms of a butcherblock couch.

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Gyorgy Kepes

Saturday, March 10th, 1990

GYORGY KEPES paints with a mixture of oil paint and sand, which gives his work a rough, earthy texture. He likes to tell the story of Antaeus, a hero who was the son of Mother Earth and could never be defeated as long as he touched the earth. Painting with sand is Kepes’s way of touching the earth.

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Simon Schama’s CITIZENS

Tuesday, March 7th, 1989

CITIZENS, Simon Schama’s wonderful new book about the French Revolution, is especially fascinating to people who care about Art, because it is in many ways a book about the power of images to transform the world.

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Otto Piene

Saturday, May 1st, 1982

As a very young man, OTTO PIENE saw the sky reflected in a sea at long last calm: “The feeling of being reborn has never left me.” Out of this rebirth came “a love for the sky, the desire to point at it, to show how beautiful it is, how it makes us live and feel alive.”

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Sky Art Conference

Friday, January 1st, 1982

Artists and scientists. working in neon, laser, steam, smoke, video, pyrotechnics, film, inflated and flying sculpture, and other celestial navigations, celebrate the sky as a medium of expression, transmission, and space.

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The Sketchbooks of Le Corbusier

Tuesday, December 1st, 1981

LE CORBUSIER created his own myth through the organic generation of forms. His genius constantly renewed itself, pulling new phenomena into the orbit of his thought and recreating them in the purified, monumental yet human forms of his architecture.

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Flora Natapoff

Thursday, October 1st, 1981

The surface of a FLORA NATAPOFF painting is a place where battles have been fought, cities and temples built up and brought down, and on which there has been a wrestling with angels. The means of expression are abstract – marks on paper and scraps of paper that must always hold their own. But the energy to work comes from looking at something that moves her.

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