Archive for the ‘Installation’ Category

El Corazon Sangrante/The Bleeding Heart

Friday, November 1st, 1991

FRIDA KAHLO’s Self-Portrait with Thorn Neck­lace and Humming­bird shows her in a jungle with butter­flies in her hair and a humming­bird dangling from a thorn neck­lace that pierces her neck, drawing small red drops of blood. “I never painted dreams,” she said. “I painted my own reality.”

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Rosemarie Trockel

Saturday, May 25th, 1991

All these images are oblit­er­ated, defaced, lost. It’s about those marginal, mundane expe­ri­ences that are for some reason signif­i­cant to her. There are certain things about her work that are myste­rious. They remain myste­rious. And she trea­sures that myste­ri­ous­ness.”

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Robert Wilson’s Vision

Thursday, January 17th, 1991

ROBERT WILSON’S VISION is struc­tured like a journey — a journey that moves from morning to night — from white to black — from the past to the future — from birth to death. A journey that has no begin­ning and no end, but all takes place in a time­less, endless present.

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Ilya Kabakov/Soviet Conceptual Art

Sunday, January 6th, 1991

When you look up, all those frag­ments convey a vertig­i­nous sense of disin­te­gra­tion, and decay. But when you look down, every­thing is compressed onto a single shiny surface, and it’s beau­tiful. All that debris — all that waste and pain — is trans­formed into art.

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Love and Death

Friday, December 14th, 1990

The prayers were long, thin strips of paper or canvas, newsprint, photographs, or tinsel, embell­ished with draw­ings, paint, cut‑outs, dried roses, gold leaf, buttons, beads. Some were abstract; some had words; others had musical nota­tions written on them. One prayer was made from a piece of old, paint‑splattered blue jeans, with a peace symbol and love beads.

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Matt Mullican

Friday, July 6th, 1990

Being inside MATT MULLI­CAN’s instal­la­tion is like being inside Matt Mulli­can’s mind — a dizzying expe­ri­ence. He’s constantly clas­si­fying and re-ordering every­thing. “It’s the first time I’ve arranged my meaning as objects in space depicting my meaning,” he says.

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Sophie Calle

Wednesday, January 24th, 1990

SOPHIE CALLE borrows elements from detec­tive novels, philo­soph­ical inves­ti­ga­tions, the film noir, the nouveau roman, docu­men­tary photog­raphy, love letters, art movies, B‑movies, John Cage’s theo­ries of random­ness, and Joseph Beuys’s actions. She combines them in star­tling ways, as medi­ta­tions on the myste­rious spaces between self and other.

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Robert Whitman

Sunday, January 14th, 1990

The canvas curled back like a white wave. The light turned red. Silhou­ettes of dancers moved through the white space like brush­strokes moving across a picture plane. The light turned white. The ceiling rippled and billowed. Silence. White light. I was taking notes, and the only sound I could hear was the sound of my own writing. It was over.

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Yoko Ono

Sunday, January 7th, 1990

Every viewer who chooses to partic­i­pate will have a different expe­ri­ence. For me, it was a moving medi­ta­tion on loss, change, and getting a second chance. As one of the char­ac­ters in William Faulkn­er’s novel The Wild Palms says, “Between grief and nothing, I will take grief.”

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My Day Without Art

Monday, December 4th, 1989

Standing at the center of the spiral, I see the backs of all the chairs facing away from me, and feel a tremen­dous shock of lone­li­ness and loss. Looking down from the balcony, I see that the chairs are the begin­ning of a spiral that could go on forever.

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The Situationists

Saturday, January 28th, 1989

The Situ­a­tion­ists called for an art of excess, delirium, outrage, and social change. They believed that capi­talism had turned contem­po­rary life into a society of “spec­tacle” that its inhab­i­tants could only passively watch and consume. Situ­a­tionism would bring art out of the museums and into the streets, and sabo­tage the society of spec­tacle by creating situ­a­tions in which people could turn their own lives into a creative expe­ri­ence.

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Ritsuko Taho

Wednesday, December 14th, 1988

RITSUKO TAHO’s ever-changing instal­la­tion is a spare but elegant invi­ta­tion to partic­i­pate in a work of art, both liter­ally and metaphor­i­cally – by bringing more leaves, and by making a leap of imag­i­na­tion that trans­forms a heap of trash on a vacant lot into a poem in silver and brown.

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John Udvardy

Monday, November 2nd, 1987

Sculptor JOHN UDVARDY sees the aesthetic possi­bil­i­ties in an old whit­tled paddle or a forked birch branch, and he knows how to make a curve from a green sapling. But most of all, he brings to his mate­rials a feeling that every mark matters: every stick, every thread, every shell, every bone.

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Otto Piene

Saturday, May 1st, 1982

As a very young man, OTTO PIENE saw the sky reflected in a sea at long last calm: “The feeling of being reborn has never left me.” Out of this rebirth came “a love for the sky, the desire to point at it, to show how beau­tiful it is, how it makes us live and feel alive.”

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Sky Art Conference

Friday, January 1st, 1982

Artists and scien­tists. working in neon, laser, steam, smoke, video, pyrotech­nics, film, inflated and flying sculp­ture, and other celes­tial navi­ga­tions, cele­brate the sky as a medium of expres­sion, trans­mis­sion, and space.

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