Archive for the ‘Galleries’ Category

Judy Kensley McKie

Saturday, December 2nd, 1995

Working in bronze, that most ancient and enduring of mate­rials, JUDY MCKIE’s work reveals the power of art to console and heal. Her Bird Foun­tain has the silent, soaring pres­ence of great mourning monu­ments. “The water makes you feel calm and peaceful,” she says. “It’s nour­ishing. A life force.”

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Paper Prayers/In the Spirit

Thursday, December 19th, 1991

Many of the artists here are of a gener­a­tion who rejected the conven­tional comforts of orga­nized reli­gion — and now they find them­selves facing the inevitable mystery of death alone. They are re-inventing rituals that feel authentic to them and finding new ways to satisfy their spir­i­tual needs. Paper Prayers has become one such contem­po­rary healing ritual — a small congre­ga­tion of artists gath­ered together In the Spirit.

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El Corazon Sangrante/The Bleeding Heart

Friday, November 1st, 1991

FRIDA KAHLO’s Self-Portrait with Thorn Neck­lace and Humming­bird shows her in a jungle with butter­flies in her hair and a humming­bird dangling from a thorn neck­lace that pierces her neck, drawing small red drops of blood. “I never painted dreams,” she said. “I painted my own reality.”

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Love and Death

Friday, December 14th, 1990

The prayers were long, thin strips of paper or canvas, newsprint, photographs, or tinsel, embell­ished with draw­ings, paint, cut‑outs, dried roses, gold leaf, buttons, beads. Some were abstract; some had words; others had musical nota­tions written on them. One prayer was made from a piece of old, paint‑splattered blue jeans, with a peace symbol and love beads.

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Chuck Holtzman

Wednesday, November 7th, 1990

His sculp­ture is like a very sophis­ti­cated game of musical chairs, where all the pieces come together for a moment of perfect, precar­ious balance. In his draw­ings, the char­coal keeps on dancing, long after the music stops.

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Louis Cartier

Friday, June 22nd, 1990

LOUIS CARTIER used precious metals and jewels in a highly polished, sparkling, and yet almost casual way way — the way Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers danced. The shimmer of dozens of tiny diamonds on a cool plat­inum surface is the essence of sophis­ti­ca­tion –- like a Cole Porter song.

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David Salle/Imitation of Life

Thursday, March 29th, 1990

One of DAVID SALLE’s favorite movies is Douglas Sirk’s IMITATION OF LIFE. In one scene, all the char­ac­ters are jammed into a taxi, watching a funeral through the windows. In Salle’s paint­ings, too, many different things are happening at once, every­thing is crammed together, nothing seems finished, every­thing is seen in reflec­tion or juxta­po­si­tion or through a filter or a pane of glass, and all of the contra­dic­tions are left unre­solved.

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Lou Jones: Sojourner’s Daughters

Friday, March 23rd, 1990

LOU JONES’s portrait of a musi­cian shows a beau­tiful old woman with strong hands and a clear, untrou­bled face. You can feel that she’s listening to music; there’s a visionary gleam in her eyes. Her portrait is juxta­posed with a faded daguer­rotype of a 19th century singer known as the Black Swan.

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Gyorgy Kepes

Saturday, March 10th, 1990

GYORGY KEPES paints with a mixture of oil paint and sand, which gives his work a rough, earthy texture. He likes to tell the story of Antaeus, a hero who was the son of Mother Earth and could never be defeated as long as he touched the earth. Painting with sand is Kepes’s way of touching the earth.

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The Starn Twins

Sunday, February 18th, 1990

It can be fright­ening, but that’s life,” said Doug. “Art is part of life,” said Mike. “It’s a real part — it’s the essence of life,” said Doug. “There’s no reason to make it perfect,” says Doug. “We want to show the phys­ical nature,” said Mike. “The phys­ical nature,” said Doug. “Of every­thing, but in partic­ular, Art,” said Mike.

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My Day Without Art

Monday, December 4th, 1989

Standing at the center of the spiral, I see the backs of all the chairs facing away from me, and feel a tremen­dous shock of lone­li­ness and loss. Looking down from the balcony, I see that the chairs are the begin­ning of a spiral that could go on forever.

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Ed Ruscha

Friday, September 8th, 1989

From the window of the studio ED RUSCHA had in the 1960’s, he could see a sign reading HOLLYWOOD. The big white letters are as flat an fake as an old, aban­doned movie set, crum­pled and peeling, with some of the letters falling down. But Ruscha’s many images of that sign make it a real sign, lumi­nous and charged with light.

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Earth Day

Sunday, May 7th, 1989

It’s all coming from memory,” says ROBERT FERRANDINI. “From fairy tales, from child­hood — from imag­ining. The way I see it, it’s the land­scape of the mind. Lots of land­scapes came to me from the movies. Fort Apache. Red River. Cheyenne Autumn. The Searchers. The idea of the search — which is what I do as a painter. I go into it. I search.”

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Roger Kizik

Wednesday, April 19th, 1989

ROGER KIZIK’s loopy, stac­cato line describes fishing boats with names like Frolic or Finast Kind, houses on the beach, the book he is reading or the tool he is using for fixing up his house or boat. The things in his draw­ings press in on him; they cluster around him, rich with hidden corre­spon­dences and secret messages, composing his life.

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Jesseca Ferguson: Distant Views and Forgotten Dreams

Wednesday, February 1st, 1989

JESSECA FERGU­SON’s construc­tions often contain old post­cards, which seem to have been sent from places that have long since disap­peared. Lost, ruined, or forgotten, they have left behind only pale and ghostly traces. Enshrined in little boxes, like the bones of saints in medieval reli­quaries, her work cele­brates the some­times mirac­u­lous power of memory to trans­form the pain and complexity of real life into the stuff of dreams, and art.

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Ritsuko Taho

Wednesday, December 14th, 1988

RITSUKO TAHO’s ever-changing instal­la­tion is a spare but elegant invi­ta­tion to partic­i­pate in a work of art, both liter­ally and metaphor­i­cally – by bringing more leaves, and by making a leap of imag­i­na­tion that trans­forms a heap of trash on a vacant lot into a poem in silver and brown.

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Frances Hamilton: Pieces of Time

Sunday, May 22nd, 1988

FRANCES HAMIL­TON’s art doesn’t come from the head; it comes from the hand and the heart. And that’s why a show of her work is always so rewarding. Her images stay with you, growing richer and deeper, as time goes by. They trigger memo­ries. Major or minor, they touch a chord.

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Animal as Metaphor

Monday, April 1st, 1985

Artists look at animals: the romantic fantasy animal, the prim­i­tive art animal, the hidden drives animal, the whim­sical animal, the elemental animal, and other myth­ical beasts. As Walt Whitman wrote,
“I think I could turn and live with animals, they are so placid and self contain’d,
I stand and look at them long and long.”

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Robert Ferrandini

Saturday, December 1st, 1984

ROBERT FERRANDINI’s early work featured flying saucers and monsters, imagery drawn from a 1950’s child­hood spent watching science-fiction movies like When Worlds Collide and The Thing. In his new paint­ings of imag­i­nary land­scapes and seascapes, he has come to some kind of terms with his past and is ready to move on. His space­ship has finally landed in a world of his own making.

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More Than Drawing

Thursday, March 1st, 1984

Draw­ings as a picture making, story telling, dream machine. Draw­ings that dance, stretch, yearn, arch, and glide across the page. The plea­sures of looking emerge here not from what is observed but from how it is rendered; not the image but the arti­fice.

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Anne Neely/Robert Ferrandini

Friday, April 1st, 1983

Yet there is exhil­a­ra­tion in the terror, the vertig­i­nous fall. These speedy, violent fantasies of destruc­tion and chaos are tenderly, beau­ti­fully described. The draw­ings in graphite and linseed oil – the oil used wonder­fully as color – and the swirls of paint in eerie sea greens or fiery reds compose a balanced, painterly surface. The language of abstrac­tion pulls us upward, as the images plunge us into the abyss.

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New Wave Painting

Tuesday, June 1st, 1982

False masks of plastic beauty are among its moving targets. Desperate to survive the glis­sando of the word processor and the deadly lull of ordi­nary life, it rips to pieces the world’s fabric and its skin and puts it back together, obses­sively recre­ating from scraps and scrawls and marks and images the objects of its desire and its rage.

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Work on Paper

Sunday, February 1st, 1981

Each rectangle is like a picture of a picture, moving through a series of trans­for­ma­tions. The tremu­lous draw­ings are like jottings, hiero­glyphics, messages in bottles, unread­able post­cards, ideas coming into being, the first appear­ances of the not-yet-visible, the impal­pable images taking form before our eyes.

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Frances Hamilton: Books and Painted Stories

Sunday, February 1st, 1981

FRANCES HAMILTON has refash­ioned much-loved images, memo­ries, and dream­strans­forming them into a fully re-imag­ined universe. It is this trans­for­ma­tion – the serious, diffi­cult task of art – that gives her work its power to enchant.

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