Archive for the ‘Antiquity’ Category

The Fire of Hephaistos

Wednesday, May 1st, 1996

These ancient bronzes, which have long since lost their golden gleam, are still numi­nous frag­ments of a vanished world. One statue of young man was recently pulled out of a river; his pale sea-green body is scratched and scarred; but he is still a lovely appari­tion, reminding me of some lines from Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”:
“Nothing of him that doth fade
But doth suffer a sea change
Into some­thing rich and strange.”

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Goddesses, Empresses, and Femmes Fatales

Sunday, October 31st, 1993

For the ancient Greeks, theater was a Dionysian ritual, and in the amphithe­ater of Perg­amon, you can still feel that myth­ical inten­sity. The steep incline of the stone seats creates a tremen­dous focus of energy on the stage. When I stood at the center and sang, I felt my voice ampli­fied, sound waves vibrating in the air.

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Fragments of Antiquity

Friday, June 21st, 1991

All that we know of Greece has come to us in ruins – armless, head­less, faded, fallen, broken, battered, lost in trans­la­tion. What we have are frag­ments, frag­ments that have lost almost every­thing – except their poetry. But, gener­a­tion after gener­a­tion, that poetry has never lost its thrilling, visionary gleam.

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Kush: Lost Kingdom of the Nile

Tuesday, December 1st, 1981

Red Sea shells and polished stones from the pyramid tomb of Queen Khensa — “great of charm, great of praise, possessor of grace, sweet of love” — and other trea­sures from KUSH, Lost Kingdom of the Nile. A medi­ta­tion on Art, Time, and the ancient river.

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